What is acne in Chinese Medicine?

Acne typically occurs for the first time in puberty when hormones are surging, however for many people it can be a life long affliction.  In addition to hormonal imbalances it can stem from diet, skin pathogens, hygiene, excess sebum production and even as a result of stress.

 

In Chinese Medicine the redness associated with pimples and pustular skin conditions is considered to be heat, the pus production is a form of ‘dampness’ and irritation is a type of toxin accumulation.

 

People who suffer from acne have often tried numerous remedies without a great deal of success and some even resort to ‘heavy duty’ pharmaceutical solutions.  For those who would prefer a more natural solution, Dr Mark Davis (TCM) has formulated a patent herbal tincture, which has been well received by acne sufferers.

 

Good results have been reported with whiteheads, cystic acne, as a result of coming off the pill, hormonal and even stubborn acne which has not responded to other treatments.

 

The formula consists of 13 all natural herbs which work from the inside out.  it is super cost effective and easy to take; it reduces the inflammation, calms the redness, and improves circulation to control localised irritation.

 

Each 200ml bottle is a one-month prescription, results are often visible during the first 3-4 weeks, however best results are usually reported by the end of the 2nd month.

Naturally gluten free, 100% animal product free and no testing on animals!

Not recommended to be taken while pregnant or in conjunction with blood thinning herbs.  No side effects should be expected, however this is general advice and you should discuss with your practitioner if you suffer from allergies.

 

Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acuuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Medical & Acupuncture Centre

 

You might find the following articles also interesting reading:

Facial Rejuvenation Acupuncture

Cosmetic Acupuncture

Nukazuke  (糠漬け)

Hello, I’m Shiatsu Masa. I’m a qualified Shiatsu practitionerat Root & Branch Oriental Therapieshere in Abbotsford, Melbourne Australia.

I am trying to improve my diet with fermented foods which are good for your gut flora.

Tsukemono (漬物) means pickles.  Japanese people love pickled vegetables. In my home town Akita, which is at the northern part of main island of Japan. It’s extremely cold in Winter. Vegetable are traditionally preserved to use throughout the winter months.

A few month ago, I was attended a Nukazuke workshop held here in Melbourne. Nuka-zuke  (糠漬け) is a type of Japanese pickles which have been fermented in flavored rice bran. (Nuka means Rice bran) Nutrient rich bran-pickled-vegetables have been supplementing important vitamins and minerals to the Japanese diet for hundreds of years. I used to make Nukazuke many years ago, but I stopped. It can be hard work the Nuka-doko (pickling bed) needs to be kneaded daily for successful fermentation.

That workshop inspire me a lot. So I stared again 🙂

Traditional Nukadoko (pickling bed) is made of equal weight of rice bran and water & Sea salt (13% in weight of rice bran). But it’s hard to get good fresh rice bran.

Today, I will explain how to make easy ‘cheats’ Nukadoko (pickling bed) at home.

My cheat version of nukadoko is made from old bread (preferable Sourdough), Beer & Sea salt (About 10~13% in weight of bread). However, this recipe doesn’t use Nuka (Rice bran) at all, so we can’t call this Nukadoko, Actually  😉

1) Make bread crumb, use food processor or you can cut them into small dices.

2) Mix bread crumb with salt in clean container. And then mix with beer for a hard mud texture. Cover and keep in a cool dark place or in fridge.

3) Once you have prepared the medium, add cleaned left over vegetables (even peel & stems) to introduce lactic acid. (If you want to more flavour add dried red chili peppers or dried kombu or even garlic).

4) For the first 3~4 days, mix the bed with your hand twice a day. After 3~4 days, discard the wilted leftover vegetables and replace with fresh vegetables.

5) About a week later, your cheat bread nukadoko is ready to pickle!  Salt rub with veggies and leave it about 5min, then dry excess moisture with Paper towels. Then put them into the mixture and cover them.

It’s depend how long does it take to pickle. Hard vegetable like carrot or daikon usually It take about 1~2 days. Longer pickle time make it more salty & sour. Check the timing with your taste buds. Preferable store in fridge.

Please remember mix nukadoko everyday or every 2 days.

 

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My Nukadoko (pickling bed) Left:  Nukadoko (Sour dough),  Right: Traditional Nukadoko

 

Usually we pickle fresh crisp veggies like carrots, cucumber, daikon or turnip.

My personal favourite is cucumber (However you should get hard & crisp one otherwise it gets very soggy pickle – Try asian type cucumber) & Stalk of Broccoli.

The workshop lecturer recommended to pickle Okra and dried Shiitake mushrooms. It’s very tasty too, and full of healthy probiotics!

 

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Carrot, Celery, Cucumber & Red Capsicum.

 

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Stalk of Broccoli, Carrot, Red Capsicum, Celery, Dried Shiitake Mushroom & Dried Black Fungi.

 

 

[LINK] ~Found great informations of Nukadzuke from internet

*How to make Nukazuke [hangawara]

Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acuuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Medical & Acupuncture Centre, 

*How to Make Nukadoko (Fermented Rice Bran Bed) for Pickling [Garden Betty]

 

*Nukadoko (Pickling Bed to Make Nukazuke) [http://japanese-kitchen.net]

 

 

My own private Miso

Easy Instant miso soup balls

Shiatsu Masa does great SHIATSU Massage Melbourne!!

 

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Easy Instant miso soup balls

Hello, I’m Shiatsu Masa. I’m a qualified Shiatsu practitionerat Root & Branch Oriental Therapieshere in Abbotsford, Melbourne Australia.

Shiatsu Masa try to eat good foods, like fermented foods.

I made my 1st home made miso about 4 month ago. Yesterday I made Instant miso soup balls.
Just mix together, Miso, bonito flakes, dried seaweed etc. (I’ve added black sesame seeds as well. – If you want to put vegetables in it – cook them 1st, otherwise miso soup balls will get too wet)
Wrap one big table spoon sized mixture with cling wrap and freeze it!!
easy hah?

When you want to have Miso soup, just put the ball in the bowl, add hot water!
There is no preservative or MSG, it’s all natural stuff.
Good foods & clean air make good Qi!
Good Qi makes you better!!
Have a bowl of Miso soup.
Keep warm yourself & don’t get cold 🙂
.
#healthy #rootandbranchorientaltherapies #shiatsumasa #miso #fermentedfoods #abbotsford #cliftonhill #melbourne #melbournewellness #misoballs #misosoup #natural #qi #goodfoods #misodama #misoshiru

Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acuuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Mehttps://rootandbranchorientaltherapies.com/2016/11/shiatsu_massage_melbourne/dical & Acupuncture Centre

 

My own private Miso

Nukazuke  (糠漬け)

Shiatsu Masa does great SHIATSU Massage Melbourne!!

 

Ear Acupuncture

Did you know that ear acupuncture can be similar to foot reflexology? Both areas of the body represent organ maps which can be beneficial to heath. The main difference between the two micro-systems is that while finger pressure is applicable to the plantar surface of the foot, the ear is smaller, thus it is necessary to use fine needles to elicit a reaction. The needles are almost completely painless and often we will send you away with a small sticky ear tack which can remain in pace for a few days to compliment body acupuncture treatment, and these can usually stay in place for up to 4-5 days. There is a famous protocol which was established in the early 1970’s called the ‘NADA protocol,’ which is still in use today for smoking cessation and heavily relied upon in drug and alcohol rehabilitation clinics.

Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acuuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Medical & Acupuncture Centre

How often do I need to book?

In the last five years or so since I have been involved with Chinese Medicine I have met all sorts of people; those who hate needles, those who don’t believe in holistic medicine yet they come as a last resort, those who wouldn’t dream of taking anything other than herbal medicines, those who think what we do is satantic etc etc… And the majority of people I have been involved with are satisfied with the care received, but often unsure of the duration of treatment required and how long cover for their private health insurance will last.
In general the longer the problem has persisted the more treatments are required, and for acute or new conditions, a shorter time frame can be expected; however it is difficult to define the treatment without a detailed analysis of individual circumstances such as age, compliance, constitution etc.
There are three stages of ‘disease’ – Active, Corrective and Recovery.  Often patients will seek treatment and find that their condition is mostly resolved after 2-3 visits and then discontinue care.  However it is pertinent to continue treatment just a little bit longer to see a resolution of symptoms through the corrective period; as a consequence of stopping care too soon will often see the same problem reoccur.  if it took 3-4 treatment to resolve the active phase of the condition, it would be smart to add another 2-3 treatments just to ensue that when rehabilita is complete the condition doesn’t relapse.  A comprehensive treatment plan would also incorporate follow-up treatments every 6 weeks or so, or around the time that seasonal changes are expected to boost immunity and proactively prevent relapse during times when our defences are lower.
Progress can generally be expected faster when acupuncture or shiatsu is combined with herbal therapy, lifestyle and dietary changes.  We are eager to get you healthy again as soon as possible, we will never encourage you to rely on our care for your health, we prescribe suitable treatment plans and empower the patient with information and knowledge to complete treatment as efficiently as possible.
Your practitioner should be able to give you a guide to your treatment plan within your first few treatments so that you know exactly what to expect and the level of commitment required.
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Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acuuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Medical & Acupuncture Centre

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Facial Rejuvenation Acupuncture

Case Study: This lady is 50 years of age,  this is her 4th facial rejuvenation treatment and already she is reporting a change in skin texture and tone.  The protocol shown here includes a point prescription for reducing frown lines, lifting the eyebrows, tightening the forehead, and strengthening the platysma muscle which lies beneath the skin on the area of the neck which often experiences sagging and jowls [DEC 2016.] Photo shared with permission from the patient.

Cosmetic acupuncture  can be used to reduce acne, brighten the skin even out the complexion and to soften lines and wrinkles.  It is important to keep up your intake of Vitamin C during the course of treatment as Vit C is critical for the production of collagen.  Very fine Japanese stainless steel needles made specifically for the face are used with minimal discomfort, some people even report that they can’t even feel the insertion.

We have recently started a herbal product inspired by popular Japanese kampo medicine which perfectly compliments our cosmetic acupuncture, the formula includes herbs for the skin, hair, eyes, spirit and resilience all in one for complete holistic care.

Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acuuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Medical & Acupuncture Centre