Shiatsu Masa does great SHIATSU Massage Melbourne!!

A treatment with Shiatsu Masa will leave you feeling like a Zen Master!

 

 

 

 

Hello, I’m Shiatsu Masa. I’m a qualified Shiatsu practitioner at Root & Branch Oriental Therapieshere in Abbotsford, Melbourne Australia.

Shiatsu Massage is a style of massage which was developed in Japan based on traditional oriental medicine doctrine.  It is still very popular in Japan today, particularly at traditional hot springs & ryokan. Each treatment typically takes between 60-90 minutes which includes a short interview to ascertain the specific needs and heath status of the client.

Treatment is undertaken with the recipient dressed, lying flat on a floor mat and includes finger, hand, and foot pressure in combination with a number of stretches and gentle rotations.  Your practitioner will probably also recommend some dietary and lifestyle advice which will support your condition after the treatment.

Post treatment most people feel invigorated, occasionally there is a healing reaction as toxins are released, however this is usually only temporary and will pass with adequate water intake.

Shiatsu not only feels great, but but it also proactively restores health, remove blockages of energy flow to stimulate circulation, promote relaxation, alleviate pain and support the body back to it natural state of homeostasis.  It is a total body therapy which may assist numerous conditions including digestive disorders, anxiety, sports injuries, insomnia, fatigue and stress.

*Shiatsu Masa focuses on easing the following conditions;

    • Lower Back Pain

    • Neck & Shoulder

    • Stress Relief

    • Depression

    • Insomnia

    • Fatigue

Shiatsu Masa is waiting to see you soon!!

Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acuuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Medical & Acupuncture Centre, Yuki Murata

Shiatsu Masa, Best Shiatsu in Massage Melbourne, Please come &  try

Nukazuke  (糠漬け)

Hello, I’m Shiatsu Masa. I’m a qualified Shiatsu practitionerat Root & Branch Oriental Therapieshere in Abbotsford, Melbourne Australia.

I am trying to improve my diet with fermented foods which are good for your gut flora.

Tsukemono (漬物) means pickles.  Japanese people love pickled vegetables. In my home town Akita, which is at the northern part of main island of Japan. It’s extremely cold in Winter. Vegetable are traditionally preserved to use throughout the winter months.

A few month ago, I was attended a Nukazuke workshop held here in Melbourne. Nuka-zuke  (糠漬け) is a type of Japanese pickles which have been fermented in flavored rice bran. (Nuka means Rice bran) Nutrient rich bran-pickled-vegetables have been supplementing important vitamins and minerals to the Japanese diet for hundreds of years. I used to make Nukazuke many years ago, but I stopped. It can be hard work the Nuka-doko (pickling bed) needs to be kneaded daily for successful fermentation.

That workshop inspire me a lot. So I stared again 🙂

Traditional Nukadoko (pickling bed) is made of equal weight of rice bran and water & Sea salt (13% in weight of rice bran). But it’s hard to get good fresh rice bran.

Today, I will explain how to make easy ‘cheats’ Nukadoko (pickling bed) at home.

My cheat version of nukadoko is made from old bread (preferable Sourdough), Beer & Sea salt (About 10~13% in weight of bread). However, this recipe doesn’t use Nuka (Rice bran) at all, so we can’t call this Nukadoko, Actually  😉

1) Make bread crumb, use food processor or you can cut them into small dices.

2) Mix bread crumb with salt in clean container. And then mix with beer for a hard mud texture. Cover and keep in a cool dark place or in fridge.

3) Once you have prepared the medium, add cleaned left over vegetables (even peel & stems) to introduce lactic acid. (If you want to more flavour add dried red chili peppers or dried kombu or even garlic).

4) For the first 3~4 days, mix the bed with your hand twice a day. After 3~4 days, discard the wilted leftover vegetables and replace with fresh vegetables.

5) About a week later, your cheat bread nukadoko is ready to pickle!  Salt rub with veggies and leave it about 5min, then dry excess moisture with Paper towels. Then put them into the mixture and cover them.

It’s depend how long does it take to pickle. Hard vegetable like carrot or daikon usually It take about 1~2 days. Longer pickle time make it more salty & sour. Check the timing with your taste buds. Preferable store in fridge.

Please remember mix nukadoko everyday or every 2 days.

 

IMG_2204
My Nukadoko (pickling bed) Left:  Nukadoko (Sour dough),  Right: Traditional Nukadoko

 

Usually we pickle fresh crisp veggies like carrots, cucumber, daikon or turnip.

My personal favourite is cucumber (However you should get hard & crisp one otherwise it gets very soggy pickle – Try asian type cucumber) & Stalk of Broccoli.

The workshop lecturer recommended to pickle Okra and dried Shiitake mushrooms. It’s very tasty too, and full of healthy probiotics!

 

IMG_2234
Carrot, Celery, Cucumber & Red Capsicum.

 

IMG_2212
Stalk of Broccoli, Carrot, Red Capsicum, Celery, Dried Shiitake Mushroom & Dried Black Fungi.

 

 

[LINK] ~Found great informations of Nukadzuke from internet

*How to make Nukazuke [hangawara]

Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acuuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Medical & Acupuncture Centre, 

*How to Make Nukadoko (Fermented Rice Bran Bed) for Pickling [Garden Betty]

 

*Nukadoko (Pickling Bed to Make Nukazuke) [http://japanese-kitchen.net]

 

 

My own private Miso

Easy Instant miso soup balls

Shiatsu Masa does great SHIATSU Massage Melbourne!!

 

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Easy Instant miso soup balls

Hello, I’m Shiatsu Masa. I’m a qualified Shiatsu practitionerat Root & Branch Oriental Therapieshere in Abbotsford, Melbourne Australia.

Shiatsu Masa try to eat good foods, like fermented foods.

I made my 1st home made miso about 4 month ago. Yesterday I made Instant miso soup balls.
Just mix together, Miso, bonito flakes, dried seaweed etc. (I’ve added black sesame seeds as well. – If you want to put vegetables in it – cook them 1st, otherwise miso soup balls will get too wet)
Wrap one big table spoon sized mixture with cling wrap and freeze it!!
easy hah?

When you want to have Miso soup, just put the ball in the bowl, add hot water!
There is no preservative or MSG, it’s all natural stuff.
Good foods & clean air make good Qi!
Good Qi makes you better!!
Have a bowl of Miso soup.
Keep warm yourself & don’t get cold 🙂
.
#healthy #rootandbranchorientaltherapies #shiatsumasa #miso #fermentedfoods #abbotsford #cliftonhill #melbourne #melbournewellness #misoballs #misosoup #natural #qi #goodfoods #misodama #misoshiru

Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acuuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Mehttps://rootandbranchorientaltherapies.com/2016/11/shiatsu_massage_melbourne/dical & Acupuncture Centre

 

My own private Miso

Nukazuke  (糠漬け)

Shiatsu Masa does great SHIATSU Massage Melbourne!!

 

Practical tips for dealing with stress & anxiety

Welcome to the year of the Rooster!
As many people will now be heading back to work, here are some:

 

 

Practical tips for dealing with Stress & Anxiety:

 

 

 

 

Chinese Medicine is often used for the management of stress and anxiety, between treatments there are things that we can do practically anywhere, which will provide some instant relief; the hardest part is just remembering to do it!

I will outline a breathing exercise and a few acupressure points which you can practice as your own ‘stress emergency kit’ for those times when you feel like the pressure is going to make you burst!

First: 4-4-8 pranayama (like yoga for breathing), it brings clarity back to your mind, and delivers more oxygen to the lungs to generate qi.  Most of us are on automatic pilot, breathing into only the very upper portion of our lungs.  Breathing is controlled by both the subconscious and the conscious mind, by consciously taking control of it we also control the automated responses our bodies have to stress, and by breathing into the belly we are stimulating the Vagus nerve which controls the parasympathetic nervous system.

 


4-4-8 Pranayama

 

 

 

 

 

Technique:

Sit in a comfortable place, close your eyes and begin to breathe in, right down to your belly.  Your belly should rise on inhalation and retract on exhalation.  Don’t worry if it takes you a little while to master it, that’s normal.  Ignore any thoughts & follow the 3 cycles of breathing below and continue for as long as it takes to calm the mind…

BREATH IN THROUGH YOUR NOSE TO THE BELLY, SLOWLY TO THE COUNT OF 1….2….3….4
HOLD YOUR BREATH NOW TO THE SLOW COUNT OF 1….2….3….4…
EXHALE THROUGH YOUR MOUTH SLOWLY TO THE COUNT OF 1….2….3….4….5….6….7….8…

 

And repeat the cycle again, for as much time as you have to spare, 5~10 minutes should be fine.  You can do this anywhere, even in the car!

 

 


 

 

 

 

Acupressure Points for Stress & Anxiety:

 

 

 

 

 

acupuncture-for-anxiety

Pericardium 6

Located on the inside of the forearm half a finger up from the palm. Press firmly and hold on one arm for 30 seconds, then alternate arms.

 

 

 

acupuncture-for-nausea-ad-vomiting

Heart 7

On the inside wrist crease just inside the tendon, you will feel on the little finger side.

 

 

 

acupuncture-for-headaches

Yintang

Between the eyebrows, being located on a bony area you can tap this point; it may also be useful for headaches.

 

 

 

acupuncture-to-calm-the-heart

Ren 17

On the lower part of the breastbone close to the intersection of the 4th ribs, again as it is a hard surface you may benefit from tapping here.

 

 

Combining these points regularly will leave you feeling less stressed and aid to treat anxiety disorders, for best results consultation with a practitioner is recommended.

 

Table 1 & 2 of the Acupuncture Evidence Project (McDonald J, and Janz S, 2017) retrieved from www.acupuncture.org.au

© Photos courtesy of: Kirschbaum, B. (2010). Atlas of Chinese tongue diagnosis. Seattle: Eastland Press.


 

 

Good luck with the self-help; feel free to message or mail me if you have any questions!

Kind Regards.

Mark Davis (Doctor of Chinese Medicine.)

Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acupuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Medical & Acupuncture Centre

 

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