Nukazuke  (糠漬け)

Hello, I’m Shiatsu Masa. I’m a qualified Shiatsu practitionerat Root & Branch Oriental Therapieshere in Abbotsford, Melbourne Australia.

I am trying to improve my diet with fermented foods which are good for your gut flora.

Tsukemono (漬物) means pickles.  Japanese people love pickled vegetables. In my home town Akita, which is at the northern part of main island of Japan. It’s extremely cold in Winter. Vegetable are traditionally preserved to use throughout the winter months.

A few month ago, I was attended a Nukazuke workshop held here in Melbourne. Nuka-zuke  (糠漬け) is a type of Japanese pickles which have been fermented in flavored rice bran. (Nuka means Rice bran) Nutrient rich bran-pickled-vegetables have been supplementing important vitamins and minerals to the Japanese diet for hundreds of years. I used to make Nukazuke many years ago, but I stopped. It can be hard work the Nuka-doko (pickling bed) needs to be kneaded daily for successful fermentation.

That workshop inspire me a lot. So I stared again 🙂

Traditional Nukadoko (pickling bed) is made of equal weight of rice bran and water & Sea salt (13% in weight of rice bran). But it’s hard to get good fresh rice bran.

Today, I will explain how to make easy ‘cheats’ Nukadoko (pickling bed) at home.

My cheat version of nukadoko is made from old bread (preferable Sourdough), Beer & Sea salt (About 10~13% in weight of bread). However, this recipe doesn’t use Nuka (Rice bran) at all, so we can’t call this Nukadoko, Actually  😉

1) Make bread crumb, use food processor or you can cut them into small dices.

2) Mix bread crumb with salt in clean container. And then mix with beer for a hard mud texture. Cover and keep in a cool dark place or in fridge.

3) Once you have prepared the medium, add cleaned left over vegetables (even peel & stems) to introduce lactic acid. (If you want to more flavour add dried red chili peppers or dried kombu or even garlic).

4) For the first 3~4 days, mix the bed with your hand twice a day. After 3~4 days, discard the wilted leftover vegetables and replace with fresh vegetables.

5) About a week later, your cheat bread nukadoko is ready to pickle!  Salt rub with veggies and leave it about 5min, then dry excess moisture with Paper towels. Then put them into the mixture and cover them.

It’s depend how long does it take to pickle. Hard vegetable like carrot or daikon usually It take about 1~2 days. Longer pickle time make it more salty & sour. Check the timing with your taste buds. Preferable store in fridge.

Please remember mix nukadoko everyday or every 2 days.

 

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My Nukadoko (pickling bed) Left:  Nukadoko (Sour dough),  Right: Traditional Nukadoko

 

Usually we pickle fresh crisp veggies like carrots, cucumber, daikon or turnip.

My personal favourite is cucumber (However you should get hard & crisp one otherwise it gets very soggy pickle – Try asian type cucumber) & Stalk of Broccoli.

The workshop lecturer recommended to pickle Okra and dried Shiitake mushrooms. It’s very tasty too, and full of healthy probiotics!

 

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Carrot, Celery, Cucumber & Red Capsicum.

 

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Stalk of Broccoli, Carrot, Red Capsicum, Celery, Dried Shiitake Mushroom & Dried Black Fungi.

 

 

[LINK] ~Found great informations of Nukadzuke from internet

*How to make Nukazuke [hangawara]

Eastential Chinese Medicine, David Yao Chi Guan, Four Seasons Wellness Centre, Shinma Acupuncture, Acuuncture Abbotsford Convent, Abbotsford Medical & Acupuncture Centre, 

*How to Make Nukadoko (Fermented Rice Bran Bed) for Pickling [Garden Betty]

 

*Nukadoko (Pickling Bed to Make Nukazuke) [http://japanese-kitchen.net]

 

 

My own private Miso

Easy Instant miso soup balls

Shiatsu Masa does great SHIATSU Massage Melbourne!!

 

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